Strange to Say

I Love You

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drunktrophywife:

shadow-nanner:

vegan-vulcan:

thinksquad:

Want to attend college for free? It can happen if you learn German.

All German universities are now free to Americans and all other international students. The last German state to charge tuition at its universities struck down the fees this week.

Even before Germany abolished college tuition for all students, the price was a steal. Typically semester fees were around $630. What’s more, German students receive many perks including discounts for food, clothing and events, as well as inexpensive or even free transportation.

In explaining why Germany made this move, Dorothee Stapelfeldt, a Hamburg senator, called tuition fees “unjust” and added that “they discourage young people who do not have a traditional academic family background from taking up study. It is a core task of politics to ensure that young women and men can study with a high quality standard free of charge in Germany.”

Actually, German universities were free up until 2006 when they started charging tuition. That triggered such a crush of criticism that German states began phasing out this policy. Lower Saxony was the last holdout.

It’s too bad that politicians in the U.S. don’t feel that a college education is worth supporting appropriately. State aid to the nation’s public universities took a nosedive during the 2008 recession and education funding remains well below those levels. The average state is spending 23 percent less per student than before the recession, according to a report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Actually, state support has been declining for public universities for a quarter of a century. Using an interactive tool from The Chronicle of Higher Education, you can see how state government subsidies have cratered at individual institutions.

With the average undergrad borrower now leaving school with more than $29,000 in debt, the free ride in Germany can look awfully tempting.

How to handle the language barrier

German is not an easy language to learn. Fortunately, however, there are international language programs in Germany, which have become very popular with international students before they tackle obtaining a degree in a different language.

What’s more, an increasing number of German universities are offering degrees in English. These are often called international studies programs or in some other way have the word international in their title.

http://www.wtsp.com/story/news/2014/10/03/german-colleges—free-degrees—americans/16658027/

This is actually making me cry…it’s one of those times when you realize that your own government just truly, honestly, does not give a shit about your wellbeing in any way.

If Americans don’t reblog this, then y’all need help.

(via dem-yaoi-hands)

Filed under College Germany Alright let's go

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Rare Words

rosettes:

acosmist - One who believes that nothing exists
paralian - A person who lives near the sea
aureate - Pertaining to the fancy or flowery words used by poets 
dwale - To wander about deliriously
sabaism - The worship of stars
dysphoria - An unwell feeling
aubade - A love song which is sung at dawn
eumoirous - Happiness due to being honest and wholesome
mimp - To speak in a prissy manner, usually with pursed lips

(Source: milkthistles, via knitders)

Filed under Words English Rare Strange

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vassilias:

MYTHOLOGY MEME  |  [3/9] GREEK GODS & GODDESSES » MORPHEUS 

Morpheus was the god of dreams in greek mythology. He was one of the three Oneiroi, sons of the god of sleep, Hypnos. Along with his two brothers, Phobetor (“nightmares”) and Phantasos (“illusion”), he was a diety of the underworld and would appear in the dreams of kings and rulers as a forebearer of omens and messages.

Filed under morpheus greek mythology

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in-somniar:

Mythology Meme [2/∞]: Achlys, a Greek death-deity

In Greek mythology, Achlys was the first being and the eternal night, predating even Chaos. She is considered the daimon of the death-mist [the clouding over the eyes that precedes death], and may have been the goddess of poisons. According to Hesiod, she was also the personification of misery and sadness, and was depicted as pale and weeping with chattering teeth, swollen knees, long fingernails, bloody cheeks, and dust-covered shoulders.

Filed under achlys greek mythology